Sally Lightfoot Crab: The Creature from the Rock Lagoon

Sally Lightfoot Crab: The Creature from the Rock Lagoon

Sally Lightfoot Crab: The Creature from the Rock Lagoon. Rock pools and their inhabitants depend on being recharged by the incoming tide, but there are ufabet creatures in this neighbourhood that came from the sea and have taken the bold step towards living on land.

Sally Lightfoot Crab: The Creature from the Rock Lagoon

Sally Lightfoot Crab: The Creature from the Rock Lagoon

They view rock pools and the sea itself as potential death traps with lurking predators, and they steer clear of them. Having left the water, however, they are exposed to new dangers, such as predatory seabirds. To survive here, they have to be either well ufabet camouflaged against the rocks and seaweeds or light on their feet.

The brightly coloured Sally Lightfoot Crab adopts the second strategy, making the move successfully from ocean to land, yet is still dependent on the sea. It lives and feeds just out of reach of sea spray in the intertidal zone but it needs water to reproduce. The mother carries her eggs until they hatch, but then places them carefully in the sea, where they are washed out to the open ocean to complete their development.

The crab is said to get its name from a Caribbean dancer, in reference to the way it jumps deftly from rock to rock and over pools. It is quick moving and difficult to catch, so predators must have a few tricks up their sleeves if they want to bag one, as producer Miles Barton discovered.

The Sally Lightfoot crabs are simply spectacular: a red and yellow wave of crabs walking along the tideline. They feed on ufabet freshly exposed algae, and are careful not to fall into the water. They seem to have a positive dislike of it.

Sometimes, though, they are caught out by the incoming tide and marooned on rocks and forced to swim for it. In a complete panic, they scuttle across the water, their legs paddling frantically. They do this because there are moray eels here, and these eels like crabs.

The eels adopt one of two stalk-and-attack strategies. Some follow the tide in and intercept crabs on their temporary islets, while others hide in rock pools waiting for crabs to pass by. As a consequence, the crabs are very careful when approaching a pool. They move slowly and deliberately, lest they attract attention, for the moray eel is alert to sudden movements.