A colony of Galápagos sea lions

A colony of Galápagos sea lions

A colony of Galápagos sea lions: In the Galápagos Archipelago in the ufabet eastern Pacific, an equally intriguing story is unfolding, in which the land itself is to play a key role.

A colony of Galápagos sea lions

A colony of Galápagos sea lions

The action takes place at the bottom of Wolf Volcano at the northern end of the island of Isabela, where the local hawks, herons and seabirds are watching their neighbours – a colony of Galápagos sea lions – for something quite extraordinary is about to happen.

Sea lions are at home on land and at sea, and they use this ability to operate in the two very different worlds to turn events to their advantage, and a gang of these ufabet sea lions is going fishing, not for mackerel or other small fish but huge yellowfin tuna – the species you are most likely to find on your plate.

The average yellowfin can weigh in at 60 kilograms, so it’s not puny, and its swimming muscles, which are kept warmer than the surrounding seawater, can propel the super-sleek fish to speeds of 40 mph. With that kind of power, it can outswim and outmanoeuvre most large marine predators, but when schools of tuna approach close to Isabela, attracted in by shoals of baitfish, they are in for a shock.

Galápagos sea lions are no slouches themselves. Bulls can be 2.5 metres long and weigh 360 kilograms, and they are fast and agile in the ufabet water, but for speed they are no match for a large tuna. They do, however, have a bigger and more complex brain than the fish, and they use it.

The smaller sea lions would then flank the main group of fish and drive them into increasingly shallower water. In order to escape the attack, the fish jumped clean out of the water and onto the rocks or flapped about on the beach. The sea lions immediately grabbed them.

Once they caught a fish, they would bite it behind the skull, much like a fisherman breaks a fish’s neck. They then used incredible strength to throw the tuna into the air, using a whipping motion to help them pull off chunks. At this point, all the birds rushed in to pick off scraps, and, of course, there was blood in the water. The sharks were in!’

Galápagos sharks are great opportunists, and larger individuals of this species of requiem shark are not averse to taking chunks out of sea lions. Many a sea lion has the scars to prove it. But, in this scenario, these ufabet sharks. which are known to be intensely inquisitive and check out any disturbances in the water, compete with the sea lions for the tuna.

The sea lions do the hard work, shepherding the fish, while the sharks muscle in, even swimming into the shallows with their backs exposed. In the resulting feeding frenzy, tuna and sea lions alike can get bitten.