Choral Reef: A cacophony of sounds under the sea

Choral Reef: A cacophony of sounds under the sea

Choral Reef: A cacophony of sounds under the sea: The sun pushes up above the horizon. The ocean is calm. Seabirds break their nocturnal silence with a round of raucous calls, a strident welcome to the new day. In rainforests, fields and ufabet marshlands all over the world, birds join in with the dawn chorus, but the remarkable thing is that this daily performance is not confined to animals living above the waves.

Choral Reef: A cacophony of sounds under the sea

Choral Reef: A cacophony of sounds under the sea

Below the surface, a cacophony of sounds fills the sea, the discordant voices of the ‘choral reef’.

Just like songbirds on land in spring, the coral reef community lets rip at dawn and again at dusk, the sounds louder in the evening than in the morning, with the greatest intensity at the time of the new moon and lowest during the full moon.

It coincides with times of greatest activity on the reef and whatever the time of day or year, it is an exuberant chorus created by some of the most unlikely ufabet performers. That fish make sounds has been known since the time of Aristotle in 350 BCE, but who would have thought sea urchins and shrimps were part of the choir?

Song of the sea

Song of the sea

The quietest sounds are the scrapes of sea urchin teeth as they feed, and a faint rasping sound of spines rubbing together, probably when cleaning. The globular shell or ‘test of the urchin amplifies the sound. The loudest sounds, often drowning out all others, are from snapping or pistol shrimps and, when many are snapping together, it sounds like bacon sizzling in a frying pan.

The shrimp makes its sound, together with a bright flash of light, by shooting a cavitation bubble from the larger of its two claws. It creates an ufabet implosion that is so loud and has so much energy that the shockwave can knock out small fish, but it is more generally used to communicate with other snapping shrimps.

Compared to the shrimps, fish are a little more reserved, but what they lack in volume they make up for in variety. The black jewfish sounds like a foghorn, clownfish clack their jaws together, and, when stressed, the threespined toadfish cries like a baby, one of the few fish known to make biphonic calls, a trick usually attributed to birds.

The coral reef’s damselfish are especially chatty. They make popping sounds with their teeth and emit chirps by vibrating muscles against their swim bladder, and, from time to time, they invent new sounds.