The Damselfish

The Sound of the Damselfish

The Sound of the Damselfish: In recent years, the ubiquitous Ambon damselfish, from the Indo-Pacific region, was discovered to emit what the researchers have described as a ‘wiping sound’, because it sounds like a ufabet windscreen wiper on dry glass. Others have likened it to a dove cooing, but whatever the description, it is very different from the pops and chirps damselfish normally make.

The Sound of the Damselfish

The Damselfish

Competition is so fierce on the coral reef that the invention of a new sound is a good way to be heard above the grunts, grumbles, growls, thumps, drums, clicks and burps from the rest of the reef fishes.

Sounds heard throughout the year, such as the chomp of the parrotfish or the daytime grumble of the damselfish, are thought to be linked to feeding and defence of territory. For two to three months each year, however, these are drowned out by the ufabet cacophony of fish engaged in courtship and spawning events or in contests for local dominance between males.

Just like birds, female bicolour damselfish can tell apart the chirps of individual males, and males can identify the chirp of their nearest rival, distinguishing it from more distant males. Each morning, as they emerge from the safety of their nocturnal hiding holes, male damselfish must re-stake their claim on a small patch of real estate.

Calling to each other ensures they are suitably spaced to avoid unnecessary fighting. Even so, on the reef in the early morning, some of its inhabitants do quarrel, and it can get physical.

While the fish and shrimps are exchanging audible brickbats ufabet, the local sea turtles are just waking up and getting ready to do battle.