How the orange dotted tuskfish using a tool to eat clams

How the orange dotted tuskfish using a tool to eat clams

How the orange dotted tuskfish using a tool to eat clams: By sunup, the orange dotted tuskfish has already arrived at his workshop on Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, and to get ahead in this challenging world it has opted for ufabet ingenuity. It has joined the exclusive club of animals – predominantly mammals and birds – that have found ways of using ‘tools’.

How the orange dotted tuskfish using a tool to eat clams

How the orange dotted tuskfish using a tool to eat clams

It likes to eat clams, so it uses a neat trick to expose one buried in the sand. Instead of blowing a mouthful of water at it, the fish turns away from the clam and snaps shut its gill covers, blasting water in the same way that closing a book creates a waft of air. Then it grabs the clam in its mouth and, with a deft movement of the head and body, smashes it against a coral.

The blows are so precise that, after a short time, the shell breaks apart. The fish then gobbles it down, swallowing the soft flesh and spitting out shattered shell fragments.

Piles of broken shells scattered around the coral head indicate that the tuskfish regularly uses the same ‘anvil’. Furthermore, similar collections of broken shells can be observed across the Great Barrier Reef, suggesting the behaviour may be widespread.

These resourceful tuskfish are in the wrasse family, and since these observations were reported several others have come to light. Off the Florida coast, the yellow-headed wrasse smashes scallops against an anvill rock, and in the ufabet Red Sea three species of wrasse collect sea urchins, drag them back to their territory, and break off the spines and split the test against a chosen rock to get at the soft parts inside.

Fish are not noted generally for their intelligence, but digging up a clam or collecting a sea urchin, carrying it some distance in its mouth to a preferred anvil and then smashing it open, like a sea otter, requires some degree of forward thinking, and for a fish that’s a big deal.