Coral mass spawning events

Coral mass spawning events

Coral bleaching has had less impact on the southern sector of Australia’s Great Barrier Reef in 2016 compared with the north, and the ufabet corals here are able to complete their normal annual cycle. At night, just after a full moon, when the water temperature is rising, they gear up for one of the most spectacular displays by a marine creature.

Coral mass spawning events

Coral mass spawning events

Corals are flamboyant at the best of times, but during spawning they surpass themselves in the mother of all mass spawning events. Each polyp taking part in the show releases a tiny package of eggs or sperm into the water. It resembles a blizzard, except the snowfall is upwards and the snow is not only white but also red, yellow and orange. The little bundles float slowly towards the surface where fertilisation then takes place.

Many of these mass-spawning events at the Great Barrier Reef seems more impressive than the last. There was so much spawn in the water, that really looks like a snowstorm.’

An event like this can last several days, with particular species spawning on different days, a guard against hybridisation, ยูฟ่าเบท and it can occur in different months depending on location. All the inshore reefs blast off around the first full moon in October. The outer reefs explode in November and December and, while the phases of the moon and temperature are the main stimuli, day length, salinity and the height of the tide can also influence whether an event will happen.

When an egg is fertilised it develops into a coral larva, known as a planula, which, like the fish larvae, is swept out into the open ocean where it drifts around on the ocean currents until it is ready to settle. When it does finally reach a reef, it must be ready to compete with already established residents. However, finding a suitable reef to call home presents the first challenge, and one cue that guides the larva is the noise of the dusk and dawn chorus.